You can thank Prohibition for this Marvelous Whiskey

You can thank Prohibition for this Marvelous Whiskey

Being a marketing guy by trade, I really admire these old advertisements from National Distillers (circa July 1934). Create sense of urgency. Check. Weave a tale of romantic scarcity. Check. Create F.U.D. (Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt). Check. The only gaff by today’s standards is the typical wail of the modern ad agency client: “There’s way too much text. Nobody’s ever going to read all that.” Thanks, Internet.

Personally, I read every word of these ads with the same savory satisfaction I get from slow sipping my new found friend: Evan Williams Single Barrel. Please forgive the alliteration indulgence. Anyway, this ad predates my first post of this ad campaign by about 3 months. I think this is the first one in the series as I’ve found a couple more that were published at later dates. ¬†They just get better over time like whiskey in the wood. Get yours while it lasts!

4 Comments

  1. Great article! This reminds me of an advertisement I saw posted on pre-pro.com from Thompson Straight Whiskey Co right before the WWI prohibition laws started coming down the pike. It’s a little less nuanced
    than the ND one you’ve posted though.

    http://www.pre-pro.com/midacore/view_photo.php?eid=x2787

    • Yes! I love these advertisements. What is interesting about the Thompson Straight Whiskey ad is it is pre-prohibition. They KNEW that prohibition was coming. So, pre and post prohibition ads selling the scarcity of pre-pro juice.

      I have two more ads I’m going to post along with a neck hang tag from and AMS bottle from this era that matches the campaign down to the typestyle.

  2. I agree! I love reading old ad copy; it’s half the fun at least. I belong to a Facebook group where we post and comment on old avertising, and I tend to get prickly when the photo is so blurry you can’t read the text. It seems to happen on what would otherwise be the most interesting submissions.

  3. I agree! I love reading old ad copy; it’s half the fun at least. I belong to a Facebook group where we post and comment on old avertising, and I tend to get prickly when the photo is so blurry you can’t read the text. It seems to happen on what would otherwise be the most interesting submissions.

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